Commentary: the American experience with aspirin desensitization for aspirin-sensitive rhinosinusitis and asthma.

Abstract

The experience in the United States with aspirin sensitivity associated with rhinosinusitis and asthma is generally in agreement with the European perspective offered by Drs. Szczeklik and Kowalski, though our approach to challenging these patients is slightly different. Most aspirin-sensitive patients no not have a family history of aspirin sensitivity. Aspirin sensitivity is found in one third of patients having nasal polyps, rhinosinusitis, and asthma, the remaining two thirds of these patients having no adverse response to aspirin ingestion. In 85% of asthmatics who give a history of aspirin-induced bronchospasm, oral aspirin challenges are positive. Thus, a small group of patients have inappropriately assigned aspirin-sensitive asthmatic (ASA) as the cause of a prior asthmatic attack that in reality had been induced by an independent provoking factor.

Cite this paper

@article{Stevenson1992CommentaryTA, title={Commentary: the American experience with aspirin desensitization for aspirin-sensitive rhinosinusitis and asthma.}, author={Donald D. Stevenson}, journal={Allergy proceedings : the official journal of regional and state allergy societies}, year={1992}, volume={13 4}, pages={185-92} }