Commentary: Skilled forensic capacity needed to investigate allegations of research misconduct

@article{Chalmers2011CommentarySF,
  title={Commentary: Skilled forensic capacity needed to investigate allegations of research misconduct},
  author={Iain Chalmers and Andy Haines},
  journal={BMJ : British Medical Journal},
  year={2011},
  volume={342}
}
An editorial introduction to the series of BMJ articles about research fraud and the MMR scare ends by noting that the affair “raises important questions about . . . what can be done to prevent something like this happening again.”1 At least one of the answers to this question was identified a decade ago. Two years after a consensus conference on misconduct in biomedical research held in Edinburgh,2 a proposed blueprint for the prevention and investigation of research misconduct was published… 
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References

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A National Panel for Research Integrity: a proposed blueprint for the prevention and investigation of misconduct in biomedical research
TLDR
There is a need to address not only deliberate research misconduct, but also to address non-intentional behaviour by researchers which falls short of good ethical and scientific standards.
Mis-investigating alleged research misconduct can cause widespread, unpredictable damage
TLDR
The BMJ article concluded that the NHS Executive needed to retract its report and reassess the appropriateness of its recommendations, since the whole edifice of administrative reform called for in the government report rested on the implied conclusion that the CNEP trial was conducted in a flawed and irresponsible way.
The Stoke CNEP Saga – did it need to take so long?
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  • Medicine
    Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
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TLDR
A national panel should be established to provide advice and assistance (on issues of research misconduct) on request and develop and promote models of good practice for local implementation.
The fraud behind the MMR scare
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    BMJ : British Medical Journal
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This week we begin a special series of articles by the journalist Brian Deer. It focuses on what may seem a familiar story—the scare linking the MMR vaccine with autism, launched at a press
The effect of the neonatal Continuous Negative Extrathoracic Pressure (CNEP) trial enquiries on research in the UK
TLDR
The first decade of the 21st century saw newborn research in the UK come close to a standstill and the intended benefits to patients of placing the NHS at the heart of initiatives to improve clinical research have been seriously compromised by over-regulation.
Checking for plagiarism, duplicate publication, and text recycling
The Stoke CNEP Saga – how it damaged all involved
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  • Medicine
    Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
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After one family made allegations about the way the study of an innovative strategy for providing nursing care was conducted, staff in the neonatal unit at North Staffordshire Hospital endured 11
The Lancet’s two days to bury bad news
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  • Medicine
    BMJ : British Medical Journal
  • 2011
In the third part of a special BMJ series, Brian Deer reveals what happened when he reported misconduct in Andrew Wakefield’s MMR research to the medical journal that published it
Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children (Retracted article. See vol 375, pg 445, 2010)
Background We investigated a consecutive series of children with chronic enterocolitis and regressive developmental disorder.Methods 12 children (mean age 6 years [range 3-10], 11 boys) were referred
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