Commentary: Defining Raptors and Birds of Prey

@article{McClure2019CommentaryDR,
  title={Commentary: Defining Raptors and Birds of Prey},
  author={Christopher J. W. McClure and Sarah E Schulwitz and David L Anderson and Bryce W. Robinson and Elizabeth K. Mojica and Jean‐François Therrien and M. David Oleyar and Jeff A. Johnson},
  journal={Journal of Raptor Research},
  year={2019},
  volume={53},
  pages={419 - 430}
}
Abstract. Species considered raptors are subjects of monitoring programs, textbooks, scientific societies, legislation, and multinational agreements. Yet no standard definition for the synonymous terms “raptor” or “bird of prey” exists. Groups, including owls, vultures, corvids, and shrikes are variably considered raptors based on morphological, ecological, and taxonomic criteria, depending on the authors. We review various criteria previously used to define raptors and we present an updated… Expand
Relative Conservation Status of Bird Orders With Special Attention to Raptors
Birds, especially raptors, play important roles in ecosystems. We examine the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Red List to determine which orders of birds haveExpand
Towards reconciliation of the four world bird lists: hotspots of disagreement in taxonomy of raptors
TLDR
The results emphasize the need to reconcile the four world bird lists for all avian orders, highlight broad disagreements across lists and identify hotspots of disagreement for raptors, in particular. Expand
Visual Adaptations in Predatory and Scavenging Diurnal Raptors
TLDR
The diversity of visual system specializations according to the foraging ecology displayed by these birds suggests a complex interplay between visual anatomy and ecology, often unrelatedly of phylogeny. Expand
Raptor research during the COVID-19 pandemic provides invaluable opportunities for conservation biology
Abstract Research is underway around the world to examine how a wide range of animal species have responded to reduced levels of human activity during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this perspectiveExpand
South African raptors in urban landscapes: a review
Globally, but especially in Africa, increasing human populations and anthropogenic land-use change are generally affecting diversity negatively. Urban environments in southern Africa typicallyExpand
Detection of Eumonospora henryae (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from Falco columbarius (Falconiformes: Aves): Comparison of host–parasite phylogram and comments on the family Sarcocystidae Poche, 1913
TLDR
Phylogenetic analyses via Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood methods using concatenated genomic datasets revealed a well-supported monophyletic clade of Eumonospora spp. Expand
Genomic Evidence for Sensorial Adaptations to a Nocturnal Predatory Lifestyle in Owls
TLDR
In the ancestral branch of the owls, traces of positive selection are found in the evolution of genes functionally related to visual perception, especially to phototransduction, and to chromosome packaging. Expand
Falconry petroglyphs in Iran: new findings on the nexus between ancient humans and birds of prey
Ethnoornithology is a multidisciplinary field of study that focuses on human-bird relationships and humans’ knowledge of the Earth’s avifauna. Falconry (the use of trained birds of prey—usuallyExpand
Lack of standardization in the use of road counts for surveying raptors
ABSTRACT Examination of population trends for raptors is a research priority, especially given recent concern for their conservation status. Road counts—in which raptors are counted from a motorizedExpand
Flight Altitudes of Raptors in Southern Africa Highlight Vulnerability of Threatened Species to Wind Turbines
Energy infrastructure, particularly for wind power, is rapidly expanding in Africa, creating the potential for conflict with at-risk wildlife populations. Raptor populations are especiallyExpand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 105 REFERENCES
CONSERVATION STATUS OF BIRDS OF PREY IN THE SOUTH AMERICAN TROPICS
TLDR
Although the majority of South America's tropical raptors appear not to be globally threatened at present, more information is needed to confirm current assessments, recognize when species become threatened, and to move quickly and efficiently to address such threats. Expand
State of the world's raptors: Distributions, threats, and conservation recommendations
Abstract Raptors provide critical ecosystem services, yet there is currently no systematic, global synthesis of their conservation status or threats. We review the International Union for theExpand
Global raptor research and conservation priorities: Tropical raptors fall prey to knowledge gaps
AIM: Raptors serve critical ecological functions, are particularly extinction‐prone and are often used as environmental indicators and flagship species. Yet, there is no global framework toExpand
European Monitoring for Raptors and Owls: State of the Art and Future Needs
TLDR
There is an urgent need to improve coordination at a pan-European scale of national initiatives that seek to monitor raptor populations, particularly the current “MEROS” program. Expand
Roles of Raptors in a Changing World: From Flagships to Providers of Key Ecosystem Services
TLDR
The need of describing and quantifying the role of these birds as providers of both regulating (rodent pest control and removal of livestock carcasses) and cultural ecosystem services is focused on and persisting conflicts with human interests are revisited. Expand
Phylogeny of eagles, Old World vultures, and other Accipitridae based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA.
TLDR
Monophyly of sea eagles and booted eagles was supported, however, harpy eagles (Harpiinae), snake eagles, and Old World vultures were found to be non-monophyletic, presenting an example of convergent evolution for specialized limb morphology enabling predation on cavity nesting species. Expand
Helminth Communities of Owls (Strigiformes) Indicate Strong Biological and Ecological Differences from Birds of Prey (Accipitriformes and Falconiformes) in Southern Italy
TLDR
Comparing the helminth communities of 5 owl species from Calabria (Italy) and Galicia (Spain) suggests that local conditions may determine fundamental differences in the composition of local communities, and birds of prey appear to share a greater pool of specific helmith taxa derived from cospeciation processes than with owls. Expand
The shapes of bird beaks are highly controlled by nondietary factors
TLDR
It is shown that beak and skull shapes in birds of prey (“raptors”) are strongly coupled and largely controlled by size, which means that, rather than being able to respond independently to natural selection, beak shapes are highly constrained to evolve in a particular way. Expand
ASPECTS OF THE HINDLIMB MORPHOLOGY OF SOME AUSTRALIAN BIRDS OF PREY: A COMPARATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE STUDY
TLDR
The extent of adaptive radiation in the evolution of the hindlimbs in the bird-of-prey community on Tasmania is quantified and the interrelationship between the morphology of hindlimb structure and the functional pressures associated with predatory lifestyles is highlighted. Expand
Evolution of terrestrial birds in three continents: biogeography and parallel radiations
TLDR
The analysis showed that three reciprocally monophyletic groups of terrestrial birds have diversified in the Gondwanan land areas of Australia, South America and Africa, respectively. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...