Commentary: Defining Raptors and Birds of Prey

@article{McClure2019CommentaryDR,
  title={Commentary: Defining Raptors and Birds of Prey},
  author={Christopher J. W. McClure and Sarah E. Schulwitz and D. L. Anderson and Bryce W. Robinson and Elizabeth K. Mojica and Jean-François Therrien and M. Oleyar and J. Johnson},
  journal={Journal of Raptor Research},
  year={2019},
  volume={53},
  pages={419 - 430}
}
  • Christopher J. W. McClure, Sarah E. Schulwitz, +5 authors J. Johnson
  • Published 2019
  • Biology
  • Journal of Raptor Research
  • Abstract. Species considered raptors are subjects of monitoring programs, textbooks, scientific societies, legislation, and multinational agreements. Yet no standard definition for the synonymous terms “raptor” or “bird of prey” exists. Groups, including owls, vultures, corvids, and shrikes are variably considered raptors based on morphological, ecological, and taxonomic criteria, depending on the authors. We review various criteria previously used to define raptors and we present an updated… CONTINUE READING

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