• Corpus ID: 243666313

Comedy as Counter-narrative: Examining Patriot Act and its Reception By Hafsa Maqsood A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY OF ARTS IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BA HONOURS IN COMMUNICATIONS

@inproceedings{Shepherd2021ComedyAC,
  title={Comedy as Counter-narrative: Examining Patriot Act and its Reception By Hafsa Maqsood A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY OF ARTS IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BA HONOURS IN COMMUNICATIONS},
  author={Tamara Shepherd and Matthew Croombs and Samantha C. Thrift},
  year={2021}
}
Comedy can convey political, economic or social commentary through humour. Yet, jokes in mainstream comedy have typically been made at the expense of marginalized communities by people of privileged social, economic, and racial standpoints. In recent decades, this has begun to change with comedians from racialized minority groups using stand-up comedy as a medium to combat negative stereotypes, represent their intersectional identities and experiences, as well as critique society. Yet, Muslim… 

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