Combined neural and behavioural measures of temporal pitch perception in cochlear implant users.

Abstract

Four experiments measured the perceptual and neural correlates of the temporal pattern of electrical stimulation applied to one cochlear-implant (CI) electrode, for several subjects. Neural effects were estimated from the electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) to each pulse. Experiment 1 attenuated every second pulse of a 200-pps pulse train. Increasing attenuation caused pitch to drop and the ECAP to become amplitude modulated, thereby providing an estimate of the relationship between neural modulation and pitch. Experiment 2 showed that the pitch of a 200-pps pulse train can be reduced by delaying every second pulse, so that the inter-pulse-intervals alternate between longer and shorter intervals. This caused the ECAP to become amplitude modulated, but not by enough to account for the change in pitch. Experiment 3 replicated the finding that rate discrimination deteriorates with increases in baseline rate. This was accompanied by an increase in ECAP modulation, but by an amount that produced only a small effect on pitch in experiment 1. Experiment 4 showed that preceding a pulse train with a carefully selected "pre-pulse" could reduce ECAP modulation, but did not improve rate discrimination. Implications for theories of pitch and for limitations of pitch perception in CI users are discussed.

DOI: 10.1121/1.4934275

Cite this paper

@article{Carlyon2015CombinedNA, title={Combined neural and behavioural measures of temporal pitch perception in cochlear implant users.}, author={Robert P. Carlyon and John M. Deeks}, journal={The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America}, year={2015}, volume={138 5}, pages={2885-905} }