Combination interventions for Hepatitis C and Cirrhosis reduction among people who inject drugs: An agent-based, networked population simulation experiment

@article{Khan2018CombinationIF,
  title={Combination interventions for Hepatitis C and Cirrhosis reduction among people who inject drugs: An agent-based, networked population simulation experiment},
  author={Bilal Khan and Ian Duncan and Mohamed Saad and D. Schaefer and Ashly E. Jordan and Daniel J Smith and Alan Neaigus and Don Des Jarlais and Holly Hagan and Kirk Dombrowski},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2018},
  volume={13}
}
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is endemic in people who inject drugs (PWID), with prevalence estimates above 60% for PWID in the United States. Previous modeling studies suggest that direct acting antiviral (DAA) treatment can lower overall prevalence in this population, but treatment is often delayed until the onset of advanced liver disease (fibrosis stage 3 or later) due to cost. Lower cost interventions featuring syringe access (SA) and medically assisted treatment (MAT) have shown mixed… 
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