Combating the Sting of Rejection With the Pleasure of Revenge: A New Look at How Emotion Shapes Aggression

@article{Chester2017CombatingTS,
  title={Combating the Sting of Rejection With the Pleasure of Revenge: A New Look at How Emotion Shapes Aggression},
  author={David S. Chester and C. DeWall},
  journal={Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
  year={2017},
  volume={112},
  pages={413–430}
}
  • David S. Chester, C. DeWall
  • Published 2017
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
  • How does emotion explain the relationship between social rejection and aggression? Rejection reliably damages mood, leaving individuals motivated to repair their negatively valenced affective state. Retaliatory aggression is often a pleasant experience. Rejected individuals may then harness revenge’s associated positive affect to repair their mood. Across 6 studies (total N = 1,516), we tested the prediction that the rejection–aggression link is motivated by expected and actual mood repair… CONTINUE READING
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