Coloured Speech Perception: Is Synaesthesia what Happens when Modularity Breaks Down?

@article{BaronCohen1993ColouredSP,
  title={Coloured Speech Perception: Is Synaesthesia what Happens when Modularity Breaks Down?},
  author={Simon Baron-Cohen and John Harrison and Laura H Goldstein and Maria A. Wyke},
  journal={Perception},
  year={1993},
  volume={22},
  pages={419 - 426}
}
Evidence was reported earlier from a single case that chromatic–lexical (CL) synaesthesia was a genuine phenomenon. A study is presented in which nine subjects were tested who also reported having coloured hearing. The following questions were addressed: (a) were these cases also genuine (ie consistent over time), (b) were they truly lexical, or rather variants of this condition, such as chromatic–graphemic (CG) or chromatic–phonemic (CP) synaesthesia, (c) did the experimental subjects show any… 

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