Colour vision in marine organisms

@article{Marshall2015ColourVI,
  title={Colour vision in marine organisms},
  author={Justin N. Marshall and Karen L. Carleton and Thomas W. Cronin},
  journal={Current Opinion in Neurobiology},
  year={2015},
  volume={34},
  pages={86-94}
}
Colour vision in the marine environment is on average simpler than in terrestrial environments with simple or no colour vision through monochromacy or dichromacy. Monochromacy is found in marine mammals and elasmobranchs, including whales and sharks, but not some rays. Conversely, there is also a greater diversity of colour vision in the ocean than on land, examples being the polyspectral stomatopods and the many colour vision solutions found among reef fish. Recent advances in sequencing… Expand
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