Colour vision as an adaptation to frugivory in primates

@article{Osorio1996ColourVA,
  title={Colour vision as an adaptation to frugivory in primates},
  author={Daniel C. Osorio and Misha Vorobyev},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1996},
  volume={263},
  pages={593 - 599}
}
  • D. Osorio, M. Vorobyev
  • Published 22 May 1996
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
Most mammals possess two classes of cone, sensitive to short and to long wavelengths of light, but Old World primates (Catarrhini) have distinct medium and long wavelength sensitive classes. The sensitivities of these cones photopigments are alike in all catarrhines with peaks at about 440 nm (‘blue’), 533 nm (‘green’) and 565 nm (‘red’). One possible reason for the evolution and conservatism of catarrhine trichromacy is that colour vision is a specialization for finding food. A model of… 

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