Colour receptors in the bee eye — Morphology and spectral sensitivity

@article{Menzel2004ColourRI,
  title={Colour receptors in the bee eye — Morphology and spectral sensitivity},
  author={Randolf Menzel and Margaret Blakers},
  journal={Journal of comparative physiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={108},
  pages={11-13}
}
Summary1.Colour coding in the retina of the honey bee,Apis mellifera, is examined by single unit recording and intracellular marking with the fluorescence dye Procion yellow.2.The three receptor types (UV, blue, green receptors) are dominated by three rhodopsin — like pigments with absorbance maxima at 350 nm, 440 nm and 540 nm. This is in general agreement with the first discription of the bee's colour receptors by Autrum and v. Zwehl, 1964.3.The UV-receptors were found to be those cells which… 
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Summary1.The temporal resolution of colour vision was measured in freely-flying honeybees by testing the performance of trained bees in discriminating between two stimuli, one of which presented a
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The spectral sensitivities of the photoreceptors in the compound eye of the stingless bee, Melipona quadrifasciata, was determined by the spectral scanning method and it is shown thatMelipona discriminates colors in the bluish green better than Apis, and that Apis discriminates all other colors better.
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The neural basis of motion and spectral wavelength processing in motion-sensitive descending neurons, which are on the optomotor response pathway, are investigated to reveal the neural contributions from other spectral receptor types.
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Microspectrophotometric data confirm that the violet receptor in the retinas of crayfish (Procambarus) is cell 8, and indicate that retinular cells 1–7 all contain a visual pigment with λmax at 530 nm.
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