Colorectal Cancer Screening: Recommendations for Physicians and Patients from the U.S. Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer

@article{Rex2017ColorectalCS,
  title={Colorectal Cancer Screening: Recommendations for Physicians and Patients from the U.S. Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer},
  author={Douglas K. Rex and C. Richard Boland and Jason A. Dominitz and Frank M Giardiello and David A. Johnson and Tonya Kaltenbach and Theodore R Levin and David A. Lieberman and Douglas J. Robertson},
  journal={The American Journal of Gastroenterology},
  year={2017},
  volume={112},
  pages={1016-1030}
}
This document updates the colorectal cancer (CRC) screening recommendations of the U.S. Multi-Society Task Force of Colorectal Cancer (MSTF), which represents the American College of Gastroenterology, the American Gastroenterological Association, and The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. [...] Key Method The second-tier tests include CT colonography every 5 years, the FIT-fecal DNA test every 3 years, and flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 to 10 years. These tests are appropriate screening tests, but…Expand
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