Color matching on natural substrates in cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis

@article{Mthger2008ColorMO,
  title={Color matching on natural substrates in cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis},
  author={Lydia M M{\"a}thger and Chuan-Chin Chiao and Alexandra Barbosa and Roger T. Hanlon},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology A},
  year={2008},
  volume={194},
  pages={577-585}
}
The camouflaging abilities of cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) are remarkable and well known. It is commonly believed that cuttlefish—although color blind—actively match various colors of their immediate surroundings, yet no quantitative data support this notion. We assembled several natural substrates chosen to evoke the three basic types of camouflaged body patterns that cuttlefish express (uniform/stipple, mottle, and disruptive) and measured the spectral reflectance of the camouflaged pattern… Expand

Paper Mentions

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TLDR
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TLDR
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