Colony nutritional status modulates worker responses to foraging recruitment pheromone in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris

@article{Molet2008ColonyNS,
  title={Colony nutritional status modulates worker responses to foraging recruitment pheromone in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris},
  author={M. Molet and L. Chittka and Ralph J. Stelzer and Sebastian Streit and N. E. Raine},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2008},
  volume={62},
  pages={1919-1926}
}
Foraging activity in social insects should be regulated by colony nutritional status and food availability, such that both the emission of, and response to, recruitment signals depend on current conditions. Using fully automatic radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology to follow the foraging activity of tagged bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) during 16,000 foraging bouts, we tested whether the cue provided by stored food (the number of full honeypots) could modulate the response of… Expand

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