Colony kin structure and male production in Dolichovespula wasps

@article{Foster2001ColonyKS,
  title={Colony kin structure and male production in Dolichovespula wasps},
  author={Kevin R. Foster and Francis L. W. Ratnieks and Niclas Gyllenstrand and Peter A. Thor{\'e}n},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2001},
  volume={10}
}
In annual hymenopteran societies headed by a single outbred queen, paternity (determined by queen mating frequency and sperm use) is the sole variable affecting colony kin structure and is therefore a key predictor of colony reproductive characteristics. Here we investigate paternity and male production in five species of Dolichovespula wasps. Twenty workers from each of 10 colonies of each of five species, 1000 workers in total, were analysed at three DNA microsatellite loci to estimate… Expand
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