Colony genetic structure in the Australian jumper ant Myrmecia pilosula

@article{Qian2011ColonyGS,
  title={Colony genetic structure in the Australian jumper ant Myrmecia pilosula},
  author={Zengqiang Qian and B. C. Schlick-Steiner and Florian M. Steiner and Simon K. A. Robson and Helge Schl{\"u}ns and Ellen A. Schl{\"u}ns and Ross H. Crozier},
  journal={Insectes Sociaux},
  year={2011},
  volume={59},
  pages={109-117}
}
Eusocial insects vary significantly in colony queen number and mating frequency, resulting in a wide range of social structures. Detailed studies of colony genetic structure are essential to elucidate how various factors affect the relatedness and the sociogenetic organization of colonies. In this study, we investigated the colony structure of the Australian jumper ant Myrmecia pilosula using polymorphic microsatellite markers. Nestmate queens within polygynous colonies, and queens and their… 

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