Colonial breeding reduces nest predation in the common gull (Larus canus)

@article{Gtmark1984ColonialBR,
  title={Colonial breeding reduces nest predation in the common gull (Larus canus)},
  author={Frank G{\"o}tmark and Malte Andersson},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1984},
  volume={32},
  pages={485-492}
}
Predation on Common Tern Eggs in Relation to Sub-colony Size, Nest Aggregation and Breeding Synchrony
TLDR
The results support the contention that both breeding in large colonies and in aggregated territories confers protection against aerial predators, and that birds breeding asynchronously earlier in the season than the average in their own sub-colony were more likely to suffer egg predation than eggs from late asynchronous nesters.
Nest Attributes, Aggression, and Breeding Success of Gulls in Single and Mixed Species Subcolonies
TLDR
Overall, L. marinus experienced more aggression and lower reproductive success than those nesting among conspecifics, where intraspecific aggression was relatively low, and L. argentatus experienced less aggression and greater reproductive success.
BREEDING SUCCESS IN THE WESTERN GULL × GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL COMPLEX: THE INFLUENCE OF HABITAT AND NEST-SITE CHARACTERISTICS
TLDR
Pairs that nest in habitats with adequate habitat structure appear to benefit in terms of lower egg loss and higher nesting success, especially in Grays Harbor, and increasing structure around individual nests may increase breeding success of gulls or other seabirds that experience extensive nest predation.
BREEDING SUCCESS, PREDATION ANDLOCAL DYNAMICS OF COLONIAL COMMON GULLS LARUS CANUS
TLDR
It is suggested that the colonies formed an interactive metapopulation-like system, which is significant for understanding how archipelago birds in the Baltic should best be protected.
The foraging ecology of Glausous Gulls preying on the eggs and chicks of Thick-billed Murres
TLDR
Gull foraging success was constrained by high murre nesting densities, collective murre defence, and the accessibility of narrow cliff ledges, however, windy conditions enhanced the ability of gulls to overcome these constraints and determine the impact of gull predation on murre reproductive success and population dynamics.
Hatching success in Lesser Black-backed Gulls Larus fuscus - an island case study of the effects of egg and nest site quality
TLDR
A detailed case study of Lesser Black-backed Gulls Larus fuscus nesting on Flat Holm island, Wales, at a time when the colony was growing, to model how hatching success was associated with clutch size, egg volume, egg laying order and local habitat features.
Nest predation and nest site selection among Eiders Somateria mollissima: the influence of gulls
TLDR
The proportion of Eider nests destroyed by predators was significantly lower within than outside gull colonies, especially on islands with Lesser Black-backed Gulls L. fuscus, and it is suggested that the colonies, to some extent, protected Eiders nests against predation.
Spatio-temporal variation in nesting success of colonial waterbirds under the impact of a non-native invasive predator
TLDR
The results of the study indicate that large breeding colonies are partially safe from mink predation, and that nest accessibility and the dilution effect influence the probability of nest survival, and suggest that the limited access to safe breeding sites on large lakes that can supply adult grebes and their chicks with food may affect bird productivity and population numbers at the landscape level.
Mixed species nesting associations in Darwin's tree finches: nesting pattern predicts predation outcome
TLDR
Controlling differences in surrounding vegetation characteristics, mixed nesting associations experienced markedly lower predation than solitary nests, and females showed a preference for males in mixed associations, as demonstrated by higher male pairing success.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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HOW IMPORTANT ARE BIRD COLONIES AS INFORMATION CENTERS
TLDR
Several methods by which birds may locate good feeding sites are discussed and the evidence for intraspecific information ex- change, intra- and intercolony variability in intrasPEcific information exchange, and inter- specific information exchange is analyzed.
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