Colonial breeding and nest defence in Montagu's harrier (Circus pygargus)

@article{Arroyo2001ColonialBA,
  title={Colonial breeding and nest defence in Montagu's harrier (Circus pygargus)},
  author={Beatriz Arroyo and François Mougeot and Vincent Bretagnolle},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2001},
  volume={50},
  pages={109-115}
}
Abstract. We assessed whether colonial breeding allows individuals to decrease their investment in predator defence, by presenting decoys of owls, foxes and crows to Montagu's harrier, Circus pygargus. Decoy detection increased with colony size, as did the number of individuals mobbing the decoy. The number of mobbers was greater for predators potentially risky for the adults (owl or fox) than for non-dangerous predators (crow). Recruits (breeding neighbours, fledglings and non-breeders) were… Expand

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