Corpus ID: 142197202

Colonial Madness: Psychiatry in French North Africa

@inproceedings{Keller2007ColonialMP,
  title={Colonial Madness: Psychiatry in French North Africa},
  author={Richard C. Keller},
  year={2007}
}
Nineteenth-century French writers and travelers imagined Muslim colonies in North Africa to be realms of savage violence, lurid sexuality, and primitive madness. "Colonial Madness" traces the genealogy and development of this idea from the beginnings of colonial expansion to the present, revealing the ways in which psychiatry has been at once a weapon in the arsenal of colonial racism, an innovative branch of medical science, and a mechanism for negotiating the meaning of difference for… Expand
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