Colon Cancer: A Civilization Disorder

@article{Watson2011ColonCA,
  title={Colon Cancer: A Civilization Disorder},
  author={Alastair J. M. Watson and P D Collins},
  journal={Digestive Diseases},
  year={2011},
  volume={29},
  pages={222 - 228}
}
Colorectal cancer arises in individuals with acquired or inherited genetic predisposition who are exposed to a range of risk factors. Many of these risk factors are associated with affluent Western societies. More than 95% of colorectal cancers are sporadic, arising in individuals without a significant hereditary risk. Geographic variation in the incidence of colorectal cancer is considerable with a higher incidence observed in the West. Environmental factors contribute substantially to this… 
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As a significant cause of cancer death worldwide, colorectal cancer (CRC) is still one of the most common cancers in the world. The most efficient strategies to reduce CRC incidence include
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