Collective group movement and leadership in wild black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra)

@article{VanBelle2012CollectiveGM,
  title={Collective group movement and leadership in wild black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra)},
  author={Sarie Van Belle and Alejandro Estrada and Paul A. Garber},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2012},
  volume={67},
  pages={31-41}
}
Maintaining social cohesion through coordinating traveling time and direction is a primary benefit of group living in mammals. During a 15-month study, we investigated socioecological factors underlying leadership of collective group movements in three multimale–multifemale groups of black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra) at Palenque National Park (PNP), Mexico. A total of 691 independent group movements across a variety of contexts were collected. Leadership of group movements was partially… 

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