Collective Response of Human Populations to Large-Scale Emergencies

@article{Bagrow2011CollectiveRO,
  title={Collective Response of Human Populations to Large-Scale Emergencies},
  author={James P. Bagrow and Dashun Wang and A L Barabasi},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2011},
  volume={6}
}
Despite recent advances in uncovering the quantitative features of stationary human activity patterns, many applications, from pandemic prediction to emergency response, require an understanding of how these patterns change when the population encounters unfamiliar conditions. To explore societal response to external perturbations we identified real-time changes in communication and mobility patterns in the vicinity of eight emergencies, such as bomb attacks and earthquakes, comparing these… 

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