Collecting data on patient experience is not enough: they must be used to improve care

@article{Coulter2014CollectingDO,
  title={Collecting data on patient experience is not enough: they must be used to improve care},
  author={Angela Coulter and Louise Locock and Sue Ziebland and Joseph D. Calabrese},
  journal={BMJ : British Medical Journal},
  year={2014},
  volume={348}
}
The NHS has been collecting data on patients’ experience of care for over 10 years but few providers are systematically using the information to improve services. Angela Coulter and colleagues argue that a national institute of “user” experience should be set up to draw the data together, determine how to interpret the results, and put them into practice 
Treating patient experience and clinical outcomes equally
  • J. Dhanda
  • Medicine
  • BMJ : British Medical Journal
  • 2014
Although more needs to be done, Coulter and colleagues are wrong to say that there is “little evidence” that collecting information on patient experience has led to any worthwhile improvements in theExpand
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Recommendations are attention to both patients' and healthcare staff's perspectives when collecting feedback, employing a coordinated approach for collecting and utilizing patient feedback, and organizational transformation towards a patient-centric culture. Expand
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