Coincident mass extirpation of neotropical amphibians with the emergence of the infectious fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

@article{Cheng2011CoincidentME,
  title={Coincident mass extirpation of neotropical amphibians with the emergence of the infectious fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis},
  author={Tina L Cheng and Sean M. Rovito and David B. Wake and Vance T. Vredenburg},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2011},
  volume={108},
  pages={9502 - 9507}
}
Amphibians highlight the global biodiversity crisis because ∼40% of all amphibian species are currently in decline. [] Key Method We describe a noninvasive PCR sampling technique that detects Bd in formalin-preserved museum specimens. We detected Bd by PCR in 83-90% (n = 38) of samples that were identified as positive by histology. We examined specimens collected before, during, and after major amphibian decline events at established study sites in southern Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. A pattern of Bd…

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