Coincidence, coevolution, or causation? DNA content, cellsize, and the C‐value enigma

@article{Gregory2001CoincidenceCO,
  title={Coincidence, coevolution, or causation? DNA content, cellsize, and the C‐value enigma},
  author={T. Gregory},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={2001},
  volume={76}
}
  • T. Gregory
  • Published 2001
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Biological Reviews
Variation in DNA content has been largely ignored as a factor in evolution, particularly following the advent of sequence‐based approaches to genomic analysis. The significant genome size diversity among organisms (more than 200000‐fold among eukaryotes) bears no relationship to organismal complexity and both the origins and reasons for the clearly non‐random distribution of this variation remain unclear. Several theories have been proposed to explain this ‘C‐value enigma’ (heretofore known as… Expand
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