Cohabitation and marital status as predictors of mortality--an eight year follow-up study.

@article{Lund2002CohabitationAM,
  title={Cohabitation and marital status as predictors of mortality--an eight year follow-up study.},
  author={Rikke Lund and Pernille Due and Jens Modvig and Bj{\o}rn Evald Holstein and Mogens Trab Damsgaard and Per Kragh Andersen},
  journal={Social science \& medicine},
  year={2002},
  volume={55 4},
  pages={
          673-9
        }
}
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Suicide and Marital Status in Italy
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The results confirm that the protective impact of marriage is higher for suicide than for natural cause of death, and the comparison between the risks of suicide and natural causes of death reveals that the groups relatively more at risk for suicide are divorced/ separated women, divorced/separated men and widowed men.
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