Cognitively Stimulating Activities: Effects on Cognition across Four Studies with up to 21 Years of Longitudinal Data

@inproceedings{Mitchell2012CognitivelySA,
  title={Cognitively Stimulating Activities: Effects on Cognition across Four Studies with up to 21 Years of Longitudinal Data},
  author={Meghan B. Mitchell and Cynthia R. Cimino and Andreana Benitez and Cassandra L. Brown and Laura E Gibbons and Robert F. Kennison and Steven D Shirk and Alireza Atri and Annie Robitaille and Stuart W. S. MacDonald and Magnus Lindwall and Elizabeth M. Zelinski and Sherry L. Willis and K. Warner Schaie and B Johansson and Roger A. Dixon and Dan Mungas and Scott M. Hofer and Andrea M. Piccinin},
  booktitle={Journal of aging research},
  year={2012}
}
Engagement in cognitively stimulating activities has been considered to maintain or strengthen cognitive skills, thereby minimizing age-related cognitive decline. While the idea that there may be a modifiable behavior that could lower risk for cognitive decline is appealing and potentially empowering for older adults, research findings have not consistently supported the beneficial effects of engaging in cognitively stimulating tasks. Using observational studies of naturalistic cognitive… CONTINUE READING