Cognitive risk-taking after frontal or temporal lobectomy—II. The synthesis of phonemic and semantic information

@article{Miller1985CognitiveRA,
  title={Cognitive risk-taking after frontal or temporal lobectomy—II. The synthesis of phonemic and semantic information},
  author={Laurie A Miller and B. Milner},
  journal={Neuropsychologia},
  year={1985},
  volume={23},
  pages={371-379}
}
Bizarre Responses, Rule Detection and Frontal Lobe Lesions
Specific impairments of rule induction in different frontal lobe subgroups
Twenty questions task and frontal lobe dysfunction.
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Brenda Milner: Pioneer of the Study of the Human Frontal Lobes
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Although Brenda Milner is best known for her studies of human memory, she has had an equally important contribution to the authors' understanding of the frontal lobes.
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