Cognitive procedures for smoking reduction: Symptom attribution versus efficacy attribution

@article{Chambliss2005CognitivePF,
  title={Cognitive procedures for smoking reduction: Symptom attribution versus efficacy attribution},
  author={Catherine A. Chambliss and Edward J. Murray},
  journal={Cognitive Therapy and Research},
  year={2005},
  volume={3},
  pages={91-95}
}
The purpose of the present study was to evaluate two cognitive procedures for reducing smoking. In the first phase of the study, a procedure was used to get the subjects to attribute withdrawal symptoms to a placebo pill rather than smoking reduction. In the second phase of the study, a procedure was used to get the subjects to attribute their partial success to themselves rather than the placebo pill. Both of these procedures were expected to interact with locus of control. 

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