Cognitive neuropsychiatric models of persecutory delusions.

@article{Blackwood2001CognitiveNM,
  title={Cognitive neuropsychiatric models of persecutory delusions.},
  author={Nigel Blackwood and Robert Howard and Richard P. Bentall and Robin M. Murray},
  journal={The American journal of psychiatry},
  year={2001},
  volume={158 4},
  pages={
          527-39
        }
}
OBJECTIVE The major cognitive theories of persecutory delusion formation and maintenance are critically examined in this article. METHOD The authors present a comprehensive review of the literature, citing results of relevant functional neuroimaging and neural network studies. RESULTS People with persecutory delusions selectively attend to threatening information, jump to conclusions on the basis of insufficient information, attribute negative events to external personal causes, and have… 
The cognitive neuropsychiatry of delusions: from psychopathology to neuropsychology and back again
TLDR
A review of the contributions from various disciplines, principally cognitive neuroscience, towards a new understanding of the nature of delusions is presented and mechanisms which are suggested to cause, contribute to, or modulate the genesis and form of delusions are highlighted.
Cognitive factors maintaining persecutory delusions in psychosis: the contribution of depression.
TLDR
Depression is common in patients with current persecutory delusions, and it shows similar cognitive features to major depressive disorder, according to the results of this study.
Imaging the deluded brain
TLDR
Mechanisms relevant to delusion formation appear to involve cognitive processes such as biases of attribution with regard to emotionally salient events as well as attentional biases during the perception of affective stimuli.
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TLDR
The aim of the model is to understand better, how pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavior therapy come forward as partners in the treatment of psychosis and play complementary and mutually reinforcing roles.
A Neuropsychiatric Model of Biological and Psychological Processes in the Remission of Delusions and Auditory Hallucinations
This selective review combines cognitive models and biological models of psychosis into a tentative integrated neuropsychiatric model. The aim of the model is to understand better, how
Subclinical delusional thinking predicts lateral temporal cortex responses during social reflection.
TLDR
Delusional thinking in the general population may be associated with reduced activity and aberrant functional connectivity of cortical areas involved in SR, as measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging in 22 healthy subjects.
Neurobiological Correlates of Delusion: Beyond the Salience Attribution Hypothesis
TLDR
It is suggested that beyond ventral striatal dysfunction, dopaminergic dysregulation in limbic areas such as the amygdala in interaction with prefrontal and temporal cortex may contribute to the formation of delusions and negative symptoms.
Persecutory delusions and the determination of self-relevance: an fMRI investigation
TLDR
Abnormalities of cingulate gyrus activation while determining self-relevance suggest impaired self-reflection in the persecutory deluded state, which may contribute to persecutory belief formation and maintenance.
Misunderstanding the intentions of others: an exploratory study of the cognitive etiology of persecutory delusions in very late-onset schizophrenia-like psychosis.
  • Rosanna Moore, N. Blackwood, +4 authors R. Howard
  • Psychology, Medicine
    The American journal of geriatric psychiatry : official journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry
  • 2006
TLDR
Patients with SLP do not appear to show the wider range of cognitive biases described in deluded patients with schizophrenia with onset in younger adult life, and mentalizing errors may contribute to the development and maintenance of persecutory delusions in SLP.
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