Cognitive architecture of a mini-brain: the honeybee

@article{Menzel2001CognitiveAO,
  title={Cognitive architecture of a mini-brain: the honeybee},
  author={R. Menzel and M. Giurfa},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2001},
  volume={5},
  pages={62-71}
}
Honeybees have small brains, but their behavioural repertoire is impressive. In this article we focus on the extent to which adaptive behaviour in honeybees exceeds elementary forms of learning. We use the concept of modularity of cognitive functions to characterize levels of complexity in the honeybee brain. We show that behavioural complexity in the honeybee cannot be explained by independent functions of vertically arranged, domain-specific processing modules, but requires horizontal… Expand

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