Cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms of alcohol-related aggression

@article{Heinz2011CognitiveAN,
  title={Cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms of alcohol-related aggression},
  author={Adrienne J Heinz and Anne Beck and Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg and Philipp Sterzer and Andreas Heinz},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2011},
  volume={12},
  pages={400-413}
}
Alcohol-related violence is a serious and common social problem. Moreover, violent behaviour is much more common in alcohol-dependent individuals. Animal experiments and human studies have provided insights into the acute effect of alcohol on aggressive behaviour and into common factors underlying acute and chronic alcohol intake and aggression. These studies have shown that environmental factors, such as early-life stress, interact with genetic variations in serotonin-related genes that affect… Expand
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