Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for Chronic Pain: What Works for Whom?

@article{Vlaeyen2005CognitiveBehavioralTF,
  title={Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for Chronic Pain: What Works for Whom?},
  author={J. Vlaeyen and S. Morley},
  journal={The Clinical Journal of Pain},
  year={2005},
  volume={21},
  pages={1-8}
}
Since the introduction of behavioral medicine in the early 70s, cognitive-behavioral treatment interventions for chronic pain have expanded considerably. It is now well established that these interventions are effective in reducing the enormous suffering that patients with chronic pain have to bear. In addition, these interventions have potential economic benefits in that they appear to be cost-effective as well. Despite these achievements, there is still room for improvement. First, there is a… Expand
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