Cognition and depression: current status and future directions.

@article{Gotlib2010CognitionAD,
  title={Cognition and depression: current status and future directions.},
  author={Ian H. Gotlib and Jutta Joormann},
  journal={Annual review of clinical psychology},
  year={2010},
  volume={6},
  pages={
          285-312
        }
}
Cognitive theories of depression posit that people's thoughts, inferences, attitudes, and interpretations, and the way in which they attend to and recall information, can increase their risk for depression. Three mechanisms have been implicated in the relation between biased cognitive processing and the dysregulation of emotion in depression: inhibitory processes and deficits in working memory, ruminative responses to negative mood states and negative life events, and the inability to use… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
Cognitive biases have been found to be possible causal and vulnerability factors for depression. There is empirical evidence on the presence of negative emotional biases in… Expand
ConditionsCognitive Change, Depression
InterventionBehavioral
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