Coffee consumption and the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults—results from a Swedish case–control study

@article{Lfvenborg2014CoffeeCA,
  title={Coffee consumption and the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults—results from a Swedish case–control study},
  author={Josefin E. L{\"o}fvenborg and Therese M.-L. Andersson and Per-Ola Carlsson and Mozhgan Dorkhan and Leif C. Groop and Mats Martinell and Bahareh Rasouli and Petter Storm and Tiinamaija Tuomi and Sofia Carlsson},
  journal={Diabetic Medicine},
  year={2014},
  volume={31},
  pages={799 - 805}
}
Coffee consumption is associated with a reduced risk of Type 2 diabetes. Our aim was to investigate if coffee intake may also reduce the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, an autoimmune form of diabetes with features of Type 2 diabetes. 

Alcohol and the risk for latent autoimmune diabetes in adults: results based on Swedish ESTRID study

The findings indicate that alcohol intake may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and type 2-like LADA, but has no beneficial effects on diabetes-related autoimmunity.

Diet and the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) : studies on the association with fish and sweetened beverages

It is suggested that long-chain n-3 PUFAs from fish may decrease the risk of LADA whereas intake of sweetened beverages may increase the risk.

Alcohol, tobacco and the risk of LADA-latent autoimmune diabetes in adults

The results suggest that alcohol consumption reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes and type 2-like LADA and indicate that LADA may to some extent be preventable by lifestyle modification.

Use of Swedish smokeless tobacco (snus) and the risk of Type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA)

The aim was to study the association between snus use and the risk of Type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA) in Scandinavia.

Smoking and the Risk of LADA: Results From a Swedish Population-Based Case-Control Study

A protective effect of smoking on autoimmunity and the risk of LADA was not observed, suggesting a protective effect could possibly be masked by a smoking-induced aggravation of insulin resistance, akin to the diabetogenic effect seen in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

Overweight, obesity and the risk of LADA: results from a Swedish case–control study and the Norwegian HUNT Study

Overweight/obesity is associated with increased risk of LADA, particularly when in combination with FHD, and these findings support the hypothesis that, even in the presence of autoimmunity, factors linked to insulin resistance, such as excessive weight, could promote onset of diabetes.

Fatty fish consumption and risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults

The findings suggest that fatty fish consumption may reduce the risk of LADA, possibly through effects of marine-originated omega-3 fatty acids.

Environmental (Lifestyle) Risk Factors for LADA.

LADA may in part be preventable through the same lifestyle modifications as type 2 diabetes including weight loss, physical activity and smoking cessation, however, current knowledge is hampered by the small number of studies and the fact that they exclusively are based on Scandinavian populations.

Low birthweight is associated with an increased risk of LADA and type 2 diabetes: results from a Swedish case–control study

Findings support LADA, despite its autoimmune component, having an aetiology that includes factors related to type 2 diabetes, and suggest that low birthweight may be a risk factor for LADA of the same strength as for type 2 Diabetes.

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The association between coffee consumption, type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance was examined and indicators of insulin sensitivity and β‐cell function according to homeostasis model assessment were studied.

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In this epidemiological study, smoking is associated with a reduced risk of autoimmune diabetes, possibly linked to an inhibitory effect on the autoimmune process.

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The association between coffee and diabetes was weaker than in the Dutch study and there was no indication of a dose–response pattern, but adjustment for lifestyle factors such as smoking and body mass index strengthened the association between Coffee consumption and type 2 diabetes.

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Long-term intake of coffee and other caffeinated beverages and decaffeinated coffee in relation to incidence of type 2 diabetes in 2 large prospective cohorts of men and women was examined and whether the associations were modified by smoking and body mass index was examined.

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Coffee drinking has a graded inverse association with the risk of type 2 DM; however, the reasons for this risk reduction associated with coffee remain unclear.

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It is concluded that habitual coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes and increasing coffee consumption as a public health strategy can't be recommended.

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It is suggested that moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may lower risk of type 2 diabetes in younger and middle-aged women.