Coffee consumption, genetic susceptibility and risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults: A population-based case-control study.

@article{Rasouli2018CoffeeCG,
  title={Coffee consumption, genetic susceptibility and risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults: A population-based case-control study.},
  author={Bahareh Rasouli and Emma Ahlqvist and Lars Alfredsson and Tomas Andersson and Per-Ola Carlsson and Leif C. Groop and Josefin E. L{\"o}fvenborg and Mats Martinell and Anders H. Rosengren and Tiinamaija Tuomi and Alicja Wolk and Sofia Carlsson},
  journal={Diabetes \& metabolism},
  year={2018},
  volume={44 4},
  pages={
          354-360
        }
}

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