Coffee and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and chronic liver disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies

@article{Bravi2017CoffeeAT,
  title={Coffee and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and chronic liver disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies},
  author={Francesca Bravi and Alessandra Tavani and Cristina Bosetti and Paolo Boffetta and Carlo la Vecchia},
  journal={European Journal of Cancer Prevention},
  year={2017},
  volume={26},
  pages={368–377}
}
An inverse association has been reported between coffee drinking and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic liver disease (CLD), but its magnitude is still unclear. Thus, we carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies that investigated the association between coffee consumption and the risk of HCC or CLD. We separately estimated the relative risk (RR) of the two conditions, for regular, low, and high consumption compared with no or occasional… Expand
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