Coffee, caffeine, and coronary heart disease

@article{Cornelis2007CoffeeCA,
  title={Coffee, caffeine, and coronary heart disease},
  author={Marilyn C. Cornelis and Ahmed El-Sohemy},
  journal={Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care},
  year={2007},
  volume={10},
  pages={745–751}
}
  • M. Cornelis, A. El-Sohemy
  • Published 1 November 2007
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care
Purpose of reviewThis review summarizes and highlights recent advances in current knowledge of the relationship between coffee and caffeine consumption and risk of coronary heart disease. Potential mechanisms and genetic modifiers of this relationship are also discussed. Recent findingsStudies examining the association between coffee consumption and coronary heart disease have been inconclusive. Coffee is a complex mixture of compounds that may have either beneficial or harmful effects on the… 
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TLDR
BP was not affected by coffee consumption although coffee consumption has a significant correlation with F2 isoprostane, and the findings suggest that correlation between coffee consumption and BP might be explained by other factors that were not included in this study.
The relationship between usual coffee consumption and serum C-reactive protein level in a Japanese female population
TLDR
It was noteworthy that the benefits of coffee consumption, even if ≥1 cup/day, on serum hsCRP levels were confirmed in Japanese women, following similarly to other ethnic data.
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