Coexistence of mutualists and antagonists: exploring the impact of cheaters on the yucca – yucca moth mutualism

@article{Marr2001CoexistenceOM,
  title={Coexistence of mutualists and antagonists: exploring the impact of cheaters on the yucca – yucca moth mutualism},
  author={Deborah L. Marr and Marcus T Brock and Olle Pellmyr},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2001},
  volume={128},
  pages={454-463}
}
Mutualists and non-mutualistic cheaters commonly coexist, but the effect of mutualist-cheater interactions on the evolution and stability of mutualisms or persistence of cheater populations is not well understood. Yuccas and yucca moths are an example of an obligate mutualism in which cheaters are frequently present. Larvae of both pollinators and cheaters eat developing yucca seeds, but cheaters no longer pollinate and rely on the mutualist species for seed availability. In this study we focus… Expand
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