Coevolution and Divergence in the Joshua Tree/Yucca Moth Mutualism

@article{Godsoe2008CoevolutionAD,
  title={Coevolution and Divergence in the Joshua Tree/Yucca Moth Mutualism},
  author={William Godsoe and Jeremy B. Yoder and Christopher I. Smith and Olle Pellmyr},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2008},
  volume={171},
  pages={816 - 823}
}
Theory suggests that coevolution drives diversification in obligate pollination mutualism, but it has been difficult to disentangle the effects of coevolution from other factors. We test the hypothesis that differential selection by two sister species of pollinating yucca moths (Tegeticula spp.) drove divergence between two varieties of the Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia) by comparing measures of differentiation in floral and vegetative features. We show that floral features associated with… Expand
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Host specificity and reproductive success of yucca moths (Tegeticula spp. Lepidoptera: Prodoxidae) mirror patterns of gene flow between host plant varieties of the Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia: Agavaceae)
TLDR
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