Coevolution, communication, and host chick mimicry in parasitic finches: who mimics whom?

@article{Hauber2006CoevolutionCA,
  title={Coevolution, communication, and host chick mimicry in parasitic finches: who mimics whom?},
  author={M. Hauber and R. Kilner},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={61},
  pages={497-503}
}
  • M. Hauber, R. Kilner
  • Published 2006
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • Why do brood parasitic Vidua nestlings mimic the intricate gape patterns of their hosts’ young so precisely? The classic explanation is that mimicry is the outcome of a coevolutionary arms race, driven by host rejection of odd-looking offspring. Selection favors parasitic nestlings that converge on the host young’s mouth markings, and simultaneously benefits hosts whose mouth markings diverge from those of the parasite. The outcome is highly elaborate mouth markings in host young that are… CONTINUE READING
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