Coercive mobility and crime: A preliminary examination of concentrated incarceration and social disorganization

@article{Clear2003CoerciveMA,
  title={Coercive mobility and crime: A preliminary examination of concentrated incarceration and social disorganization},
  author={Todd R. Clear and Dina R. Rose and Elin Waring and Kristen L. Scully},
  journal={Justice Quarterly},
  year={2003},
  volume={20},
  pages={33 - 64}
}
This article explores how incarceration affects crime rates at the neighborhood level. Incarceration is analyzed as a form of residential mobility that may damage local network structures and undermine informal control. Geocoded data are combined with census data, data on incarceration convictions and releases, and crime data for Tallahassee, Florida. The results show a positive relationship between the rate of releases one year and the community's crime rates the following year. They also show… 

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