Coeliac disease—a meeting point for genetics, immunology, and protein chemistry

@article{Mowat2003CoeliacDM,
  title={Coeliac disease—a meeting point for genetics, immunology, and protein chemistry},
  author={AllanMci. Mowat},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2003},
  volume={361},
  pages={1290-1292}
}
  • A. Mowat
  • Published 2003
  • Medicine, Biology
  • The Lancet
CONTEXT Coeliac disease is caused by a genetically determined, specific immune response to antigens present in wheat gluten. This immune response may be focused on a limited region of the alpha gliadin component of gluten, and previous studies have suggested that the generation of epitopes for recognition by CD4+ T cells requires deamidation of the protein by tissue transglutaminase. However, it had not previously been shown that candidate epitope peptides could be generated from gluten in vivo… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Modifications of anchor residues that lead to an improved affinity for major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and altered conformation of the peptide–MHC complex may be a critical factor leading to T cell responses to gliadin and the oral intolerance of gluten found in CD. Expand
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The characterised cytokine profiles support the notion that mucosal T cells activated in situ by gluten in a DQ restricted fashion play a central part in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease. Expand
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