Coefficients of relatedness in sociobiology

@article{Michod1980CoefficientsOR,
  title={Coefficients of relatedness in sociobiology},
  author={Richard E. Michod and William D. Hamilton},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1980},
  volume={288},
  pages={694-697}
}
A much-discussed, quantitative criterion for the spread of an altruistic gene is Hamilton's rule1,2 c/b < R (1) where c and b are additive decrement and increment to fitness of altruist and recipient, respectively, and R is a measure of genetic relatedness between the two individuals. When rearranged as −c.1+b.R > 0, the rule can be interpreted as requiring that the gene-caused action increase the ‘inclusive fitness’ of the actor. Since its introduction, Hamilton's rule and the attendant… Expand
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