Cockpit-cabin communication: II. Shall we tell the pilots?

@article{Chute1996CockpitcabinCI,
  title={Cockpit-cabin communication: II. Shall we tell the pilots?},
  author={Rebecca D. Chute and Earl L. Wiener},
  journal={The International journal of aviation psychology},
  year={1996},
  volume={6 3},
  pages={
          211-31
        }
}
In a previous article (Chute & Wiener, 1995), we explored the coordination between the "two cultures" in an airliner's crew: cockpit and cabin. In this article, we discuss a particular problem: the dilemma facing the cabin crew when they feel that they have safety-critical information and must decide whether to take it to the cockpit. We explore the reasons for the reluctance of the flight attendant to come forward with the information, such as self-doubt about the accuracy or importance of the… 

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