Coastal Subsistence, Maritime Trade, and the Colonization of Small Offshore Islands in Eastern African Prehistory

@article{Crowther2016CoastalSM,
  title={Coastal Subsistence, Maritime Trade, and the Colonization of Small Offshore Islands in Eastern African Prehistory},
  author={Alison Crowther and Patrick Faulkner and Mary E. Prendergast and Er{\'e}ndira M. Quintana Morales and Mark C. Horton and Edwin N. Wilmsen and Anna M. Kotarba-Morley and Annalisa Christie and Nik Petek and Ruth Tibesasa and Katerina Douka and Llorenç Picornell-Gelabert and Xavier Carah and Nicole Boivin},
  journal={The Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology},
  year={2016},
  volume={11},
  pages={211 - 237}
}
ABSTRACT Recent archaeological research has firmly established eastern Africa's offshore islands as important localities for understanding the region's pre-Swahili maritime adaptations and early Indian Ocean trade connections. While the importance of the sea and small offshore islands to the development of urbanized and mercantile Swahili societies has long been recognized, the formative stages of island colonization—and in particular the processes by which migrating Iron Age groups essentially… 

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