Coadaptation of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, and the cost of mother's curse

@article{Connallon2018CoadaptationOM,
  title={Coadaptation of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, and the cost of mother's curse},
  author={Tim Connallon and M. Florencia Camus and Edward H. Morrow and Damian K. Dowling},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2018},
  volume={285}
}
Strict maternal inheritance renders the mitochondrial genome susceptible to accumulating mutations that harm males, but are otherwise benign or beneficial for females. This ‘mother's curse’ effect can degrade male survival and fertility if unopposed by counteracting evolutionary processes. Coadaptation between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes—with nuclear genes evolving to compensate for male-harming mitochondrial substitutions—may ultimately resolve mother's curse. However, males are still… 

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