Co-payments for health care: what is their real cost?

@article{Laba2015CopaymentsFH,
  title={Co-payments for health care: what is their real cost?},
  author={Tracey‐Lea Laba and Tim Usherwood and Stephen Leeder and Farhat Yusuf and James A. Gillespie and Vlado Perkovic and Andrew Wilson and Stephen Jan and Beverley M Essue},
  journal={Australian health review : a publication of the Australian Hospital Association},
  year={2015},
  volume={39 1},
  pages={
          33-36
        }
}
  • T. Laba, T. Usherwood, B. Essue
  • Published 24 February 2015
  • Political Science, Medicine
  • Australian health review : a publication of the Australian Hospital Association
Based on the premise that current trends in healthcare spending are unsustainable, the Australian Government has proposed in the recent Budget the introduction of a compulsory $7 co-payment to visit a General Practitioner (GP), alongside increased medication copayments. This paper is based on a recent submission to the Senate Inquiry into the impact of out-of-pocket costs in Australia. It is based on a growing body of evidence highlighting the substantial economic burden faced by individuals… 
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