Co-Residence Patterns in Hunter-Gatherer Societies Show Unique Human Social Structure

@article{Hill2011CoResidencePI,
  title={Co-Residence Patterns in Hunter-Gatherer Societies Show Unique Human Social Structure},
  author={K. Hill and R. Walker and Miran Bozicevic and J. Eder and Thomas N. Headland and B. Hewlett and A. Hurtado and F. Marlowe and Polly Wiessner and B. Wood},
  journal={Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={331},
  pages={1286 - 1289}
}
Individuals in residential groups in contemporary hunter-gatherer societies are unrelated to each other. Contemporary humans exhibit spectacular biological success derived from cumulative culture and cooperation. The origins of these traits may be related to our ancestral group structure. Because humans lived as foragers for 95% of our species’ history, we analyzed co-residence patterns among 32 present-day foraging societies (total n = 5067 individuals, mean experienced band size = 28.2 adults… Expand
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