Clouds and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

@article{Goldblatt2010CloudsAT,
  title={Clouds and the Faint Young Sun Paradox},
  author={Colin Goldblatt and Kevin J. Zahnle},
  journal={Climate of The Past},
  year={2010},
  volume={7},
  pages={203-220}
}
Abstract. We investigate the role which clouds could play in resolving the Faint Young Sun Paradox (FYSP). Lower solar luminosity in the past means that less energy was absorbed on Earth (a forcing of −50 W m−2 during the late Archean), but geological evidence points to the Earth having been at least as warm as it is today, with only very occasional glaciations. We perform radiative calculations on a single global mean atmospheric column. We select a nominal set of three layered, randomly… 
Earth’s long-term climate stabilized by clouds
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Comment on "Clouds and the Faint Young Sun Paradox" by Goldblatt and Zahnle (2011)
Goldblatt and Zahnle (2011) raise a number of issues related to the possibility that cirrus clouds can pro- vide a solution to the faint young sun paradox. Here, we argue that: (1) climates having a
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Early in Earth’s history, the Sun provided less energy to the Earth than it does today. However, the Earth was not permanently glaciated, an apparent contradiction known as the faint young Sun
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